I Was Not Silenced – Juneteenth Commemoration

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2 mins read

For over 400 years people of color in America have been enslaved, oppressed, lynched, and hated. June 19th (Juneteenth) is what should be a National Holiday observing when black folks heard about their freedom. But what is freedom, what does that look like? You mean we now have the freedom to remain right where we are and be treated just the same as we have always been treated? Yes, that is what they called freedom.

“I Was Not Silenced” is based on the 23rd Chapter of Job; he had everything but when everything was stripped from him and he became enslaved by the darkness of his pain, he refused to allow silence to be an option for him. He cried and argued, moaned and groaned because the oppression of his wounds kept him bitter and frustrated, but he did not lose his hope.

As we celebrate this holiday, I am holding steadfast to that hope that lives within me, even though the darkness of racism, hatred, bigotry, and anything else not of God is encamped all around us, still in 2020; we are more than conquerors, but we have to remember that in order to be a conqueror, you have to be tried in the fire. What do you say about a people who have been tried in the fire for over 400 years? Yes, we are tired, yes, we are angry, and no we will not get over it, but we still stand up to injustice and inequity, lift up our voices. Moreover we will come through the fire pure as gold.


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From the flat lands of the Mississippi Delta surrounded by cotton fields, a close-knit family, and great music in the early 80s Melvin Myles, the youngest of 5, was born into a devout Baptist/Christian family. Melvin’s parents have served several decades as a Pastor and First Lady and started a family gospel group comprised of all his siblings and parents at an early age that aided him in becoming an accomplished classically trained musician and singer. Jackson State University in Jackson, MS aided Melvin in further developing his musical gifts. Melvin, a concerned Navy veteran, is now committed to improving the quality of life and services for veterans and several vulnerable populations through his work as a philanthropist and small business owner.

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