How do election recount rules apply to close races?

4 mins read

How do election recount rules apply to close races?

Election recounts make sure all votes are counted fairly in close elections

A few close midterm races will determine which party will control Congress. What rules apply?

When does a recount take place? Who requests it? Who pays for the recount? What are the key races where a recount may take place? How does ‘ballot curing’ relate to a recount? How can you help? Here are some answers, Thanks to the wonderful research by Jen Kauffman.

Election Recount Rules

The data shown on this map will change as vote counting proceeds. Please refer to official sites for the latest information.

Mapping close 2022 races and election recount rules
Share this map freely with this link

What is a recount?

An election recount is a process by which votes cast in an election are re-tabulated to verify the accuracy of the original results. Recounts typically occur in the event of a close margin of victory, following accusations of election fraud, or due to the possibility of administrative errors. Recounts can either occur automatically or be requested by a candidate or voters. Recounts can happen in races at any level, from local offices up to presidential elections. In the case of presidential elections, however, recounts are carried out at the state level rather than nationally. – BallotPedia

Make information actionable

Good data helps decide where to focus. It’s the same with vote counts even while the counts are underway and vote counts are changing. This map makes data actionable by showing:

  • Who pays for a requested recount?
  • Refund available?
  • Can candidates request a partial recount?
  • What is the margin required for a candidates or voters to request a recount?
  • What state rules apply for an automatic recount?
Data available as a spreadsheet is good but requires more effort to use

Data visualization makes information useful

The data from the Google Sheet becomes more useful when presented as a map. Different types of information from the Google Sheet tabs (Tight Races / Who Pays / Requested / Automatic Margin) are presented together on the map. Click on a state to see the recount rules for that state. Click on a congressional district (highlighted in green) to see the status of the vote count as of Nov 11, 2022. (NOTE THE VOTE COUNT INFORMATION IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE AND NOF REFLECTED ON THE MAP). The key races that might be subject to a recount are shown in green to make them easy to see. Links on the map provide a call to action where readers can donate to support a recount and learn where to volunteer to help ‘cure ballots’.

This map was created with ArcGIS Online by a DemLabs volunteer in three hours. Request pro bono help with maps and data visualization for projects related to social justice and voting rights here. Credit to research by Jen Kauffman.

Presenting data as a map makes it easier to understand and use.

TakeAway: Make better decisions and easier for supporters to help by quickly sharing data in an easy to understand manner.

Deepak
DemLabs


DISCLAIMER:
 ALTHOUGH THE DATA FOUND IN THIS BLOG AND INFOGRAPHIC HAS BEEN PRODUCED AND PROCESSED FROM SOURCES BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, NO WARRANTY EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED CAN BE MADE REGARDING THE ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, LEGALITY OR RELIABILITY OF ANY SUCH INFORMATION. THIS DISCLAIMER APPLIES TO ANY USES OF THE INFORMATION WHETHER ISOLATED OR AGGREGATE USES THEREOF.
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Reposted from Democracy Labs with permission.


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