Pennsylvania Member of Congress Tracking Report – 09.26.21

40 mins read
Graphic by Kelly Pollock.

This is a 100% volunteer effort brought to you by a handful of progressive Democrats and Independents who share a vision of an informed electorate.  Thank you to the Demcast and Pennsylvania Indivisible organizations who host our report and help us share it with Commonwealth residents!

Indivisible Scorecard

The Indivisible movement is focused on four key principles – equality, justice, compassion and inclusion. Accordingly, we score legislation that reflects those values:

  • Ballot access, voting rights, campaign finance and ethics
  • Civil rights, equality under the law and addressing systemic inequities
  • Reinforcing and strengthening democratic norms, processes, and oversight
  • Addressing economic inequality

The House votes on reproductive freedom and raising the debt limit were scored.

LawmakerScoreChange from last score
🔵 Senator Bob Casey100.0%No change
🔴 Senator Pat Toomey29.4%No change
🔴 PA-01’s Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick45.2%-3.9%
🔵 PA-02’s Rep. Brendan Boyle100.0%0.0%
🔵 PA-03’s Rep. Dwight Evans100.0%0.0%
🔵 PA-04’s Rep. Madeleine Dean100.0%0.0%
🔵 PA-05’s Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon100.0%0.0%
🔵 PA-06’s Rep. Chrissy Houlahan100.0%0.0%
🔵 PA-07’s Rep. Susan Wild100.0%0.0%
🔵 PA-08’s Rep. Matt Cartwright100.0%0.0%
🔴 PA-09’s Rep. Dan Meuser3.3%-0.3%
🔴 PA-10’s Rep. Scott Perry0.0%0.0%
🔴 PA-11’s Rep. Lloyd Smucker8.1%-0.7%
🔴 PA-12’s Rep. Fred Keller3.2%-0.3%
🔴 PA-13’s Rep. John Joyce3.2%-0.3%
🔴 PA-14’s Rep. Guy Reschenthaler3.2%-0.3%
🔴 PA-15’s Rep. Glenn W. Thompson8.3%-0.8%
🔴 PA-16’s Rep. Mike Kelly3.2%-0.3%
🔵 PA-17’s Rep. Conor Lamb100.0%0.0%
🔵 PA-18’s Rep. Mike Doyle100.0%0.0%

The House Votes to Protect Reproductive Freedoms 

House Vote on H.R. 3755: Women’s Health Protection Act of 2021

Thi is a piece of legislation meant to codify a person’s right to an abortion, as guaranteed by the landmark Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision.  It was introduced by California’s Rep. Judy Chu, who has submitted similar legislation in each season of Congress dating back through 2013.

Assuming that most readers are well aware of the situation in Texas, and the near-party-line nature of any abortion rleated topic, let’s instead take a look at some of the key excerpts of from the text of the bill.

From the “findings” section of the text of the bill:

  • (4) “Reproductive justice requires every individual to have the right to make their own decisions about having children regardless of their circumstances and without interference and discrimination. Reproductive Justice is a human right that can and will be achieved when all people, regardless of actual or perceived race, color, national origin, immigration status, sex (including gender identity, sex stereotyping, or sexual orientation), age, or disability status have the economic, social, and political power and resources to define and make decisions about their bodies, health, sexuality, families, and communities in all areas of their lives, with dignity and self-determination.”
  • (6) “The legacy of restrictions on reproductive health, rights, and justice is not a dated vestige of a dark history. Presently, the harms of abortion-specific restrictions fall especially heavily on people with low incomes, BIPOC, immigrants, young people, people with disabilities, and those living in rural and other medically underserved areas. Abortion-specific restrictions are even more compounded by the ongoing criminalization of people who are pregnant, including those who are incarcerated, living with HIV, or with substance-use disorders. These communities already experience health disparities due to social, political, and environmental inequities, and restrictions on abortion services exacerbate these harms. Removing medically unjustified restrictions on abortion services would constitute one important step on the path toward realizing Reproductive Justice by ensuring that the full range of reproductive health care is accessible to all who need it.”
  • (9) “Since 2011, States and local governments have passed nearly 500 restrictions singling out health care providers who offer abortion services, interfering with their ability to provide those services and the patients’ ability to obtain those services.”
  • (25) “Congress has the authority to enact this Act to protect abortion services pursuant to –
    • (a) its powers under the commerce clause of section 8 of article I of the Constitution of the United States;
    • (b) its powers under section 5 of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States to enforce the provisions of section 1 of the Fourteenth Amendment; and
    • (c) its powers under the necessary and proper clause of section 8 of Article I of the Constitution of the United States.”

From the “purpose” section of the legislative text: “It is the purpose of this Act:

  • (1) to permit health care providers to provide abortion services without limitations or requirements that single out the provision of abortion services for restrictions that are more burdensome than those restrictions imposed on medically comparable procedures, do not significantly advance reproductive health or the safety of abortion services, and make abortion services more difficult to access;
  • (2) to promote access to abortion services and women’s ability to participate equally in the economic and social life of the United States”

Vote date: Friday, September 24, 2021 Vote Tally: 218-211

Party Breakdown: This was one vote away from being a party line affair.  All republicans voted NO and All but one Democrats voted YES. Texas Democrat Henry Cuellar voted NO alongside the Republicans.

Additional Reading:

One more piece of the 2022 Funding has passed the House

House Vote on H.R. 4350: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022

Prior to the August Recess, MoCTrack provided a recap for the bills related to 2022 annual funding that had passed the House. This process is normally a last minute grind, but the House had gamely passed about ¾ of the budget.  This bill represents one more piece of that process.  Of course, the Senate didn’t choose to take up the bills that the House had previously passed, so we are once again one week out from a looming government shutdown.

From the Library of Congress summary for this bill, the portions of the government that this authorization funds includes “military activities and programs of the Department of Defense (e.g., personnel; research, development, test, and evaluation; and procurement of items such as aircraft, missiles, and ammunition). It also prescribes military personnel strengths for FY2022.”

Vote date: Thursday, September 23, 2021 Vote Tally: 316-113

Party Breakdown: The vote split on this bill was quite interesting.  About 23 of Republicans voted YES and a little more than ⅓ voted NO.  Many of those NO votes came from the ranks of the “Freedom Caucus” (like 🔴 PA-10’s Rep. Scott Perry and his buddies) but there were some lawmakers that are seen as more traditional Republicans (🔴 PA-11’s Rep. Lloyd Smucker for example) among those NOs. For Democrats, about 83% voted YES and 17% voted NO.  Most of the NO votes came from the House PRogressive Caucus.


Additional Reading:

All House Republicans Vote Against Raising the Debt Limit, Emergency Funding

House Vote on H.R. 5305: Extending Government Funding and Delivering Emergency Assistance Act

As discussed in the previous entry, the United States is facing a potential shutdown after September 30, 2021, if the Congress does not pass the 2022 funding bills.  We are also facing a financial crisis if the Congress does not raise the debt-limit.  This bill is a solution to both problems, in that it both raises the debt limit through December 2022 and includes “continuing resolution” text, the legislative version of kicking the can down the road and keeping existing levels of funding in palace through a set date – in this case, through December 3, 2021.

Vote date: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 Vote Tally: 220-211

Party Breakdown: This was a pure, party line vote.  All Democrats voted YES.  All Republicans voted NO.


Additional Reading:

Judicial confirmations

There is very little information about judicial nominees/confirmed judges that cannot be found in the recaps provided by the most excellent source, The Vetting Room. MoCTrack will be relying solely on their content for most judicial confirmation recaps from now on.

Judicial confirmation – Washington

Senate Confirmation Vote on David G. Estudillo to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Washington

Key excerpts from The Vetting Room profile of Judge Estudillo:

  • “David G. Estudillo was born in 1974 in Sunnyside, Washington, the son of Mexican immigrants who came to the United States in the 1960s as part of the Bracero program.[2]  One of ten children, Estudillo worked at the family store before getting a B.A. from the University of Washington in 1996 and a J.D. from the University of Washington School of Law in 1999.”
  • “In 2015, Estudillo was appointed by Governor Jay Inslee to the Grant County Superior Court, replacing Judge Evan Sperline and becoming the only Latino superior, district, or municipal court judge in eastern Washington.”
  • “The under-staffed Western District of Washington is, in many ways, a casualty of the nominations fight between Washington’s U.S. Senators and the Trump Administration.  Had the fight not happened, Estudillo, with ties to the local Republican Party, and fairly conservative rulings, but having been appointed by the Democratic Governor, could have been a consensus candidate that the Administration and Senators could have agreed to.  It is a bit more unusual for a Democratic Administration that seemingly has an unlimited supply of liberal lawyers to choose from to select Estudillo. Nonetheless, Estudillo has extensive experience with civil and criminal litigation, and, as a longtime immigration practitioner, would bring an unusual perspective to the federal bench, if and when he is confirmed.”

Vote date: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 Vote Tally: 54-41

Party Breakdown: All of the Democrats and Independents voted YES, along with 5 Republicans. The remaining 41 NO votes were all from Republicans.

Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey voted NO.

Judicial confirmation – Massachusetts

Senate Confirmation Vote on Angel Kelley to be United States District Judge for the District of Massachusetts

Key excerpts from The Vetting Room profile of Angel Kelley:

  • “Judge Angel Kelley (also known as Angel Kelley Brown) is a state judge in Massachusetts with a varied resume, including serving as a federal prosecutor, a clinical instructor, and a legal aid attorney.”
  • “Kelley received a B.A. from Colgate University in 1989, and then obtained a J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center in 1992. After graduation, Kelley worked for the Juvenile Rights Division with the Legal Aid Society in Brooklyn for four years before being hired by the Litigation Division of the NY & NJ Port Authority.”
  • “In 2009, Kelley was nominated by Governor Deval Patrick to be a Judge on the Massachusetts District Court. In 2013, Patrick elevated Kelley to the Massachusetts Superior Court.”

Vote date: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 Vote Tally: 52-44

Party Breakdown: All of the Democrats and Independents voted YES, along with 3 Republicans. The remaining 44 NO votes were all from Republicans.

Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey voted NO.

Judicial confirmation – Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals

Senate Confirmation Vote on Veronica S. Rossman to be United States Circuit Judge for the Tenth Circuit

Key excerpts from The Vetting Room profile of Judge Rossman:

  • “Rossman was born Veronica Sophia Parkansky to a Jewish family in Moscow in 1972.  After getting a B.A. from Columbia University in 1993, Rossman joined the University of California Hastings Law School, graduating in 1997.  After graduating, Rossman clerked for Chief Justice A. William Maupin on the Nevada Supreme Court before joining Morrison & Foerster as a litigation associate.”
  • “In 2003, Rossman became an assistant federal defender in the Districts of Colorado and Wyoming for a year and then spent a year at Mastbaum & Moffat, and a year as a staff attorney with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit before becoming a professor at the University of Denver, Sturm College of Law. Since 2010, Rossman has worked as a Federal Defender for the Districts of Colorado and Wyoming, serving as Senior Counsel since 2017.”
  • “Rossman joined a team of public defenders filing an amicus brief in Welch v. United States, asking the Supreme Court to hold that Johnson v. United States, which voided the residual clause of the Armed Career Criminal Act, should be applied retroactively.]  The Supreme Court agreed with Rossman’s position in a 7-1 decision (with Justice Thomas as a lone dissenter).”

Vote date: Monday, September 20, 2021 Vote Tally: 50-42

Party Breakdown: Only two Republicans joined the united front of Democrats and Independents in voting YES – Maine’s Susan Collins and Alaska’s Lisa Murkowski.  All other Republicans voted NO.

Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey voted NO.

Judicial confirmation – New Mexico

Senate Confirmation Vote on Margaret Irene Strickland to be United States District Judge for the District of New Mexico

Key excerpts from The Vetting Room profile of Margaret Strickland:

  • “Margaret Strickland received her B.A. from the University of Texas-El Paso  in 2003 and a J.D. from New York University Law School in 2006.  Strickland then spent the next five years as a Public Defender in New Mexico. Since 2011, Strickland has worked as a partner at McGraw & Strickland LLC in Las Cruces.  She was also the President of the New Mexico Criminal Defense Lawyers Association from 2017 to 2019.“
  • “President Trump made two attempts to fill this [vacant] seat, first nominating U.S. Magistrate Judge Kevin Sweazea and then federal prosecutor Fred Federici.  However, neither nominee received a hearing due to the opposition of New Mexico Senators.”
  • “Strickland is a mirror image of the candidates frequently sought out by the Trump Administration for the bench.  She is young, outspoken regarding the issues she holds dear, and has a distinguished legal record.”

Vote date: Tuesday, September 21, 2021 Vote Tally: 52-45

Party Breakdown: All of the Independents and Democrats voted YES and they were joined by three Republicans – South Carolina’s Lindsey Graham, Maine’s Susan Collins and Alaska’s Lisa Murkowski. The other 45 Republicans present voted NO.

Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey voted NO.

Judicial confirmation – Washington, DC

Senate Confirmation Vote on Florence Y. Pan to be United States District Judge for the District of Columbia

Key excerpts from The Vetting Room profile of the confirmed judge:

  • “Florence Yu Pan graduated summa cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania in 1988 and then received her J.D. cum laude from Stanford Law School in 1993.  After graduating, Pan clerked for Judge Michael Mukasey on the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York and for Judge Ralph Winter on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit before joining the Department of Justice as a Bristow Fellow in the Office of the Solicitor General.  Pan then worked in the Department of Treasury between 1998 and 1999.”
  • “In 2016, D.C. Superior Court Judge Florence Pan became the first Asian woman tapped for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.  Despite a favorable recommendation from the Republican-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee, Pan’s nomination was never confirmed.”
  • “Since her confirmation in 2009, Pan has served as a Judge on the D.C. Superior Court.  She started her time in the court on a Felony docket, but has since served on the Family, Misdemeanor, and Civil dockets as well.”

Vote date: Thursday, September 23, 2021 Vote Tally: 68-30

Party Breakdown: Nineteen Republicans votes YES along with all of the Independents and Democrats.  The 30 remaining Republicans all voted NO.

Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey voted YES.

Bureaucratic Confirmations

Editor’s note: now that we are almost a year into the Biden Administration, almost all of the major bureaucratic positions have been filled – certainly there are no more cabinet level seats and few deputy and major agency leadership positions open.  Many of the positions filled are getting down well past the deputy level, MoCTrack is going to provide slightly less information about these confirmations. Any hgh level replacement confirmations will still get full coverage, as will judicial confirmations, but these lower level bureaucrats are not often covered in traditional media, so we are left with only press releases and less reliable sources for information. MoCTrack would prefer to provide less but firmly reliable information than repeat unverifiable or unreliable outlets.

Bureaucratic Confirmation – Education 

Senate Confirmation Vote on James Richard Kvaal to be Under Secretary of Education

From the White House announcement of Mr. Kvaal’s nomination: “James Kvaal is the president of the Institute for College Access & Success. He previously served as the deputy domestic policy adviser at the White House, where he worked on a range of issues related to economic opportunity. His work on higher education included initiatives to make college tuition more affordable, protect students from unaffordable loans, and help many more students graduate from college. Over the course of his career, he has also served in senior roles at the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. House of Representatives,  and the U.S. Senate. Kvaal has taught at the University of Michigan’s Ford School of Public Policy and attended Stanford University and Harvard Law School.”

Vote date: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 Vote Tally: 58-37

Party Breakdown: All of the Democrats were joined by both Independents and nine Republicans in voting YES.  The remaining 37 NO votes were all from Republicans.
Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey voted NO.

Bureaucratic Confirmation – Treasury   

Senate Confirmation Vote on Lily Lawrence Batchelder to be an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury

From the White House announcement of Ms. Batchelder’s nomination: “Lily Batchelder is the Robert C. Kopple Family Professor of Taxation at NYU School of Law and an affiliated professor at the NYU Wagner School of Public Service. From 2014 to 2015, she served as Deputy Director of the White House National Economic Council and Deputy Assistant to the President under President Obama. There, she was responsible for tax and budget issues, including tax reform, retirement policy, and low-income benefits. From 2010 to 2014, she served as Majority Chief Tax Counsel for the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance, where she led Chairman Baucus’s work on tax issues, including tax reform and the fiscal cliffs. Batchelder’s scholarship and teaching focus on personal income taxes, wealth transfer taxes, business tax reform, retirement savings, social insurance, and the effects of fiscal policy on economic insecurity, income disparities, and intergenerational mobility. Before joining NYU in 2005, Batchelder was an associate at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, director of community affairs for a New York state senator, and a client advocate for a small social services organization in Ocean Hill-Brownsville, Brooklyn. Batchelder received an AB in Political Science with honors and distinction from Stanford University, an MPP from the Harvard Kennedy School, and a JD from Yale Law School.”

Vote date: Wednesday, September 22, 2021 Vote Tally: 64-34

Party Breakdown: All of the Democrats present, both Independents and 15 Republicans voted YES.  The other 34 Republicans present voted NO.

Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey voted YES.

Bureaucratic Confirmation – Trade Representative, Europe  

Senate Confirmation Vote on Jayme Ray White to be a Deputy United States Trade Representative (Western Hemisphere, Europe, the Middle East, Labor, and Environment), with the rank of Ambassador

From the nomination announcement released by the office of the United States Trade Representative, Katherine Tai: “Jayme White has spent two decades working to ensure American trade policy empowers American workers and promotes a sustainable environment. Mr. White grew up in Seattle, WA, where his family were union workers for Boeing. He went to Washington, DC to work for his hometown member of Congress in the House of Representatives, Representative Jim McDermott, who served on the Committee on Ways and Means, which has jurisdiction over international trade. Since then, he has played a role in nearly every major trade issue and trade legislation, over the last 20 years. Mr. White has served in the US Senate since 2009, including as the chief trade advisor for the Senate Committee on Finance since 2014, under the leadership of Chairman Ron Wyden. During this tenure, White led efforts to level the playing field for American workers, through trade negotiations and agreements, and by reforming US trade laws to better respond to unfair foreign trade practices. In his role on the Finance Committee, he has long represented and advanced bipartisan US views to foreign trade leaders, and the outcomes of those efforts are evident in many trade agreements. Key provisions — especially enforceable measures on labor and the environment — found in the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) are a result of his efforts.”

Vote date: Tuesday, September 14, 2021 Vote Tally: 80-18

Party Breakdown: This widely popular nominee got YES votes from 47 Democrats, 2 Independents and 31 Republicans.  All 18 NO votes were from Republicans.

Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey voted YES.

Bureaucratic Confirmation – Trade Representative, Asia

Senate Confirmation Vote on Sarah Bianchi to be Deputy United States Trade Representative (Asia, Africa, Investment, Services, Textiles, and Industrial Competitiveness), with the rank of Ambassador

From the nomination announcement released by the office of the United States Trade Representative, Katherine Tai: “Sarah Bianchi has spent nearly a decade in government roles in economic and domestic policy including in the Office of the Vice President, the White House Domestic Policy Council, the Office of Management and Budget and the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. In 2011, Ms. Bianchi was appointed by then Vice President Biden as his head of economic and domestic policy where she ran the economic and domestic policy team in the Office of the Vice President and coordinated all policy initiatives ranging from workforce competitiveness to manufacturing to budget negotiations. She also served as Deputy Assistant to the President for Economic Policy. Bianchi has also served as a senior advisor to the Biden Institute at the University of Delaware where she worked on a variety of economic policies and served as Chair of the Institute’s Policy Advisory Board.  Bianchi has served in a number of private sector roles as well. Most recently, she joined Evercore ISI in 2019 in the macroeconomic research group where she leads the United States public policy research. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 1995 and has served on the Senior Advisory Committee at the Institute of Politics at Harvard University since 2004. Bianchi and her husband have a twelve-year-old daughter and ten-year-old son and live in Arlington Virginia.”

Vote date: Thursday, September 23, 2021 Vote Tally: 85-11

Party Breakdown: The only NO votes for this nominee were placed by 11 Republicans, mostly from the insurrectionist wing (like Ted Cruz of Texas and Josh Hawley of Missouri) and the presidential hopefuls (like Marco Rubio of Florida and Tom Cotton of Arkansas). 

Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey voted YES.

Bureaucratic Confirmation – State Department

Senate Confirmation Vote on Daniel J. Kritenbrink to be an Assistant Secretary of State (East Asian and Pacific Affairs)

From the White House announcement of Mr. Kritenbrink’s nomination: “Daniel J. Kritenbrink, a career member of the Senior Foreign Service, Class of Minister-Counselor, has been U.S. Ambassador to Vietnam since 2017.  He was previously the Senior Director for Asian Affairs at the National Security Council, and Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.  In earlier tours in Beijing, he served as Political Minister Counselor, and as a Political Officer.  Kritenbrink was Director of the Office of Chinese and Mongolian Affairs at the Department of State.  He also served as a Political-Military officer at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo.  Kritenbrink earned a Master’s Degree at the University of Virginia, and a Bachelor’s Degree at the University of Nebraska-Kearney.  He speaks fluent Chinese and Japanese.”

Vote date: Thursday, September 23, 2021 Vote Tally: 72-14

Party Breakdown: The only NO votes for this nominee were placed by 14 Republicans… and like the last nominee, these were mostly from the insurrectionist wing (like Ted Cruz of Texas and Josh Hawley of Missouri) and the presidential hopefuls (like Marco Rubio of Florida and Tom Cotton of Arkansas). We also saw some NO votes from the Libertarian wing (Mike Lee of Utah and Rand Paul of Ketucky).

Bob Casey voted YES.

Pat Toomey did not vote.

Votes under Suspension of the Rules 

Some bills are so uncontroversial that the leadership of both parties coordinate to bring the bills up under a suspension of the rules – that means that debate and amendments are limited, but the bill needs a ⅔ supermajority to pass.  These 4 bills were brought up under a suspension of the rules this week.

🗳️ House Vote on H.R. 5293: Department of Veterans Affairs Expiring Authorities Act of 2021

This bill addresses several funding issues that would have run out at the end of the month.  Specifically, it funds the dental insurance plans for veterans and surviving beneficiaries; authorized travel reimbursements for veterans who need to receive care in distant Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, and reauthorizes a pilot program that accepts donated property for VA usage.

Vote date: Monday, September 20, 2021 Vote Tally: 423-0

Pennsylvania breakdown: Our delegation voted 18-0 in support of this bill.

🗳️ House Vote on S. 189: Veterans’ Compensation Cost-of-Living Adjustment Act of 2021

From the LIbrary of Congress summary of the bill: “This bill requires the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to increase the amounts payable for wartime disability compensation, additional compensation for dependents, the clothing allowance for certain disabled veterans, and dependency and indemnity compensation for surviving spouses and children. Specifically, the VA must increase the amounts by the same percentage as the cost-of-living increase in benefits for Social Security recipients that is effective on December 1, 2021. The bill requires the VA to publish the amounts payable, as increased, in the Federal Register. The VA is authorized to make a similar adjustment to the rates of disability compensation payable to persons who have not received compensation for service-connected disability or death.”

Vote date: Monday, September 20, 2021 Vote Tally: 423-0

Pennsylvania breakdown: Our delegation voted 18-0 in support of this bill.

🗳️ House Vote on S. 1828: HAVANA (Helping American Victims Afflicted by Neurological Attacks) Act of 2021

From the LIbrary of Congress summary of the bill: “This bill specifically authorizes the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of State, and other agencies to provide payments to agency personnel who incur brain injuries from hostilities while on assignment. Specifically, the bill allows agency personnel and their families to receive payments for brain injuries that are incurred (1) during a period of assignment to a foreign or domestic duty station; (2) in connection with war, insurgency, hostile acts, terrorist activity, or other agency-designated incidents; and (3) not as the result of willful misconduct.”

Vote date: Monday, September 20, 2021 Vote Tally: 427-0

Pennsylvania breakdown: Our delegation voted 18-0 in support of this bill.

🗳️ House Vote on H.R. 5323: Iron Dome Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2022

From the LIbrary of Congress summary of the bill: “This bill provides $1 billion in supplemental appropriations for the Department of Defense to provide to the government of Israel for the procurement of the Iron Dome defense system to counter short-range rocket threats.”

Vote date: Thursday, September 23, 2021 Vote Tally: 420-9

Pennsylvania breakdown: Our delegation voted 18-0 in support of this bill.

Unanimously passed legislation

The following bills were passed through unanimous consent or voice vote (which presumes unanimity, as any member can object to the voice vote and ask for a roll call). This list excludes bills related to post offices, stamps, memorials, awareness weeks and other ceremonial activities.

  • H.Res.626 – Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives regarding the terrorist attacks launched against the United States on September 11, 2001, on the 20th anniversary of that date
  • S.273 – Driftnet Modernization and Bycatch Reduction Act
  • S.297 – Reinforcing American-Made Products Act

Editor’s Note: Despite our best efforts, MoCTrack is likely to be more votes focused in the coming weeks, and may be both light on the quotes and missing the educational and call to action segments. We have some health issues amongst our editorial and contributor ranks, so please bear with us as we do our best to get out content this autumn.  Thanks in advance for your patience!

This report is brought to you by the Pennsylvania  MoCTrack team… 

CC Linda Houk

Gary Garb Kierstyn Piotrowski Zolfo

Have you seen an interesting or revealing recent quote from a member of Pennsylvania’s Congressional delegation that was not featured in MoCTrack? We are looking for folks who can help us cover what gets into traditional media, especially in the western parts of the state! Please email KierstynPZ@gmail.com and put “MoC Quote” in the subject, and please be sure to include a link to the article, the article title, and the full quote (in case your editor gets paywalled). Thanks!


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