Pennsylvania Member of Congress Tracking Report – 01/03/21

46 mins read
Graphic by Kelly Pollock.

This is a 100% volunteer effort brought to you by a handful of progressive Democrats and Independents who share a vision of an informed electorate.  We want to offer a big thank you to the Demcast and Pennsylvania Indivisible organizations who host our report and help us share it out to the residents of our Commonwealth!

The report will be taking next week off, so we can get set up for the new 117th Congress.
Happy New Year and here’s to the end of the 116th Congress!!

Tracking Congress in the Age of Trump

The lower the number, the more the legislator votes in opposition to the Trump agenda.

Member of Congress115th Congress (2017-2018)116th Congress (2019-2020)LifetimeRating
Senator Bob Casey (D)32.1%23.3%29.1%
Senator Pat Toomey (R)88.9%82.9%86.9%
PA-01 Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (R)88.4%37.9%62.3%
PA-02 Rep. Brendan Boyle (D)20.2%7.9%14.2%
PA-03 Rep. Dwight Evans (D)18.1%5.7%12.2%
PA-04 Rep. Madeleine Dean (D)n/a5.6%5.6%
PA-05 Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon (D)66.7%5.6%7.6%
PA-06 Rep. Chrissy Houlahan (D)n/a6.7%6.7%
PA-07 Rep. Susan Wild (D)66.7%7.9%9.8%
PA-08 Rep. Matt Cartwright (D)30.5%7.1%19.6%
PA-09 Rep. Dan Meuser (R)n/a94.1%94.1%
PA-10 Rep. Scott Perry (R)85.3%94.3%89.6%
PA-11 Rep. Lloyd Smucker (R)95.8%92.9%94.4%
PA-12 Rep. Fred Keller (R)n/a88.1%88.1%
PA-13 Rep. John Joyce (R)n/a95.5%95.5%
PA-14 Rep. Guy Reschenthaler (R)n/a93.0%93.0%
PA-15 Rep. Glenn W. Thompson (R)99.0%93.1%96.2%
PA-16 Rep. Mike Kelly (R)96.8%93.1%95.1%
PA-17 Rep. Conor Lamb (D)68.0%10.1%22.8%
PA-18 Rep. Mike Doyle (D)23.4%8.0%15.9%

Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight website assesses the voting records of our MoCs to provide this index, and since the folks at 538 have not indicated yet if they plan on tracking some similar metric for the 117th Congress, this might be the last we see of these numbers for our Pennsylvania MoCs.

Above, we show each member’s score for the 115th Congress (where GOP Speaker Paul Ryan set the agenda) as well as their 116th Congress and lifetime score numbers. Keep in mind that the lifetime number is not just an average of the 115th and 116th Congresses – it is based on overall votes, some of which were weighted.  

An observation about those italicized numbers from the 115th Congress:
It may seem peculiar that Rep. Scanlon and Rep. Wild have ratings in the 115th Congress when they won their elections in November 2018… and even weirder that those numbers are so high, indicating agreement with President Trump. I assure you, there is a log to it.

Both of those lawmakers took their seats in December 2018 at the close of the 115th Congress to fill vacancies – Scanlon replaced Patrick Meehan, who left as part of a #MeToo scandal, while Wild replaced Charlie Dent, a moderate GOP lawmaker who resigned when his tenure became untenable in the Trump era. The votes that were scored at the end of the 115th Congress were for the Farm Bill (a negotiated package that passed with wide congressional support), a criminal justice package (which also had both congressional and presidential approval) and funding for the border wall. Both Reps. Scanlon and Wild voted for the first two and against the third, giving them their 66.7% rating for the 115th Congress. This situation can also be seen in the numbers of Rep. Lamb, who was only present for about 20% of the voting in the 115th Congress, much of it must-pass or negotiated packages with wide support.

Shutdown averted, President Trump signed the 2021 Funding/COVID Relief bill

This is old news at this point, but your MoCTrack editor is a completion-ist. Last Sunday night, after a week of delays, President Trump signed the 2021 government funding package and coronavirus relief package.

The 2021 government funding portion of the package includes:

  • $23.4 billion in discretionary funding to agriculture, rural development, Food and Drug Administration (increase of $217 million from the FY 2020 budget)
  • $346 billion for the Economic Development Administration (increase of $13 million)
  • $695.9 billion to the Department of Defense, including $68.7 billion for the Overseas Contingency Operations fund (decrease of $9.7 billion)
  • $73.5 billion for the Department of Education (increase of $785 million)
  • $39.62 billion to the Department of Energy (increase of $1 billion)
  • $9.2 billion to the Environmental Protection Agency (increase of $180 million)
  • $374 million for the Federal Communications Commission (increase of $35 million)
  • $475 million for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (increase of $10 million)
  • $21.67 billion for Federal Emergency Management Administration (decrease of $604 million)
  • $351 million to the Federal Trade Commissioner (increase of $20 million)
  • $1.926 billion for the Securities and Exchange Commission (increase of $100 million)
  • $922 million for the Small Business Administration (decrease of $60 million)
  • $51.88 billion to the Department of Homeland Security (increase of $1.41 billion)
  • $15.28 billion for Customs and Border Protection (increase of $370 million)
  • $7.97 billion for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (decrease of $106 million)
  • $2 billion for the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (increase of $9.4 million)
  • $97 billion in base discretionary funding for Health and Human Services (increase of $2 billion)
  • $114 billion for SNAP, also known as food stamps (increase of $46 million)
  • $25.118 billion for Child Nutrition Programs (increase of $80 million)
  • $49.6 billion is from discretionary appropriations for Housing and Urban Development (increase of $3.8 billion)
  • $13.7 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of the Interior (increase of $186 million)
  • $33.8 billion overall for the Department of Justice (increase of nearly $1.2 billion)

Data extracted from a resource on the FY 2021 Omnibus Appropriations Bill from the National Conference of State Legislatures website

The COVID Relief portion of the bill includes:

  • Direct economic relief via stimulus checks of $600 for individuals making up to $75,000 per year
  • Payroll Tax Deferral & Paid Leave Credits
  • Extends the date by which state and local governments must make expenditures with CARES Act Coronavirus Relief Fund (CRF) awards by 12 months
  • Provides $120 billion in unemployment insurance (UI) and extends the Federal Pandemic unemployment Compensation (FPUC) program through March 14, 2021, providing $300 per week for all workers receiving unemployment benefits
  • Provides $325 billion in small business funds
  • Provides for a one-time, one-year increase in the Medicare physician fee schedule of 3.75% to support physicians and other professionals
  • Temporary freeze for “aging out” foster youth
  • $73 billion to Health and Human Services to support public health
  • $25.4 billion to the Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund to support testing and contact tracing to effectively monitor and suppress COVID-19
  • $4.25 billion for Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to provide increased mental health and substance abuse services and support
  • $13 billion for agriculture production in new agricultural aid, including direct payments to farmers producers, protections for food and agriculture workers, and specific support for smaller producers
  • $15 billion in transit aid primarily destined for local governments with about $13.3 billion for urbanized areas and $1 billion for rural areas, a program run by state DOTs
  • $15 billion for airlines to support payrolls, $1 billion to Amtrak, with $655 million for the Northeast Corridor and $344 million for the national network, $2 billion for airports, and $2 billion split between the motorcoach, school bus and ferry industries
  • $54.3 billion for the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund
  • $7 billion to expand broadband access for students, families and unemployed workers
  • Provides a temporary extension to the current CDC eviction moratorium (until Jan. 31, 2021) and an additional $25 billion in emergency rental assistance
  • Provides $10 billion in direct funding to the USPS without requiring repayment

Data extracted from a resource on the COVID-19 Economic Relief Bill from the National Conference of State Legislatures website

Additional Reading:

Mitch McConnell Squashed hope of a $2,000 COVID Relief payment to Americans

House Vote on H.R. 9051: CASH (Caring for Americans with Supplemental Help) Act of 2020

Senate Action on same

As we all know, last week President Trump held up the signing of the carefully negotiated COVID Relief package and called for the $600 planned payments to be increased to $2,000 per person.  The Democrats more or less said “fine, we’re good with that,” and quickly crafted H.R. 9051 and brought it up for a vote within days of the president’s demand.  The bill was brought to the floor under a suspension of the rules, a move that necessitates a ⅔ supermajority for passage, but eliminates a lot of the floor debate time and all of the amendments. And it passed.

Of more interest to us Pennsylvanians is the drama in the Senate, where the bill never came up for a vote, partially because of the actions of our own GOP Senator Pat Toomey.  Much was made in the media of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s decision to not bring this bill up for a vote, and his insistence that if it was to be voted upon, the clean bill would get weighed down with objectionable amendments and pork. But our own Sen. Toomey played a role in killing the $2,000 payments.

Below you will find a portion of the 12/30/20 Congressional Record, where Sen. Bernie Sanders tries to get this bill to be voted upon, and Senator Toomey blocks it. The comments from Bernie Sanders are excerpted, but Pat Toomey’s response is included in full. Even if you don’t read it in full (Toomey does do a bit of a history lesson in there), check out the part highlighted in red – where Senator Pat Toomey makes the argument that our nation should let millions of people suffer, go hungry, have debts pile up, etc. because he doesn’t think that the mall portion of people who are not in dire financial stairs should get checks.

Sanders: “I want to concur with what Senator Schumer said. What he said goes beyond economics. It goes beyond the desperation that tens of millions of working families are facing. It goes beyond the struggles of the people of Vermont or Kentucky… It is not just about the massive 

levels of income and wealth inequality. It is about basic democracy.

…all that Senator Schumer and I are asking of the majority leader is very simple: Allow the Members of the U.S. Senate to cast a vote. If you want to vote against $2,000 checks for people in your State, vote against it. I see Senator Toomey here. He has been clear about it. I suspect he will vote against it. I respect his opinion, but all that we are asking for is a vote. What is the problem?”

Toomey: “In reserving the right to object, let me start by pointing out that we are not in the same place that we were back in March. Our economy is in nothing like the situation we faced during a moment in March when this body came together and voted unanimously, I believe, for the most extraordinary aid package–financial stimulus bill, however you care to characterize it–in the history of the world by far. Remember where we were. We had closed down the economy. To a very large degree, the American economy had stopped functioning because State governments around the country decided they had to close it down. We can discuss and we can argue about whether that was a good decision or not, but given the limited knowledge we had about the nature of the COVID-19 threat, it was deemed to be the right thing to do.

So we were on the verge of having no economy. That has never happened before in our history.

So what did we do? We decided this calls for extraordinary measures, and we would try to use Federal dollars as a substitute for the economy–just replace lost income on a massive, unprecedented scale–and we did. We approved almost $3 trillion in that legislation.

At the time, we included $1,200 per person. You could make an argument that that was an extremely inefficient use of that $1,200 per person, but at the time, given the circumstances, I understood why we didn’t have many good options, and that was something we decided to do.

So where are we now? We are in a very different place. Our economy is not in a free fall. Our economy is in a recovery mode. We are not back to where we want to end up. We are not back to where we were before March, but we have taken big steps in that direction.

The economy grew at 33 percent last quarter–33 percent. That is a tremendous recovery that is underway. More than half of all the people who lost their jobs earlier this year have regained their jobs. So we are not finished yet, but that is a huge step along the way.

And now we are being told, after passing another extraordinary bill–this one almost $1 trillion and including $600 per person–that that is not enough; we need to do $2,000 per person, despite the fact that we know for sure, we know for a fact, that the large majority of those checks are going to go to people who had no lost income.

How does that make any sense at all? We know for sure that the majority of these people had no lost income. They didn’t lose their jobs, and yet we are going to send them not $600, not the $1,200, but $2,000.

So think about this. A married couple, who both are working and have 2 kids, maybe they work for the Federal Government, like 2 million-odd people do. Maybe they work for a large company, the vast majority of which did not have large numbers of layoffs. So this two-child, two-income couple that makes six figures had no interruption, no diminishment of their income whatsoever. They are going to get $8,000 of money we don’t have that is going to be either borrowed or printed. That is what it is all going to come down to.

There are people who are still suffering from the economic fallout of this terrible COVID crisis. There is no question about it. We know there are people who are concentrated in a handful of industries, for the most part–not exclusively–but people who have worked in the restaurant industry, people who work for hotels, travel, entertainment. So many of those people are still out of work and their prospects of getting their old jobs back are not good in the short run. I sure hope they will be good in the medium-term run, if not sooner.

And our bill addressed that. It addressed that problem. How did we do that? With a new round of PPP loans, which are really grants to small businesses, if they will keep their workforce intact; expansion of unemployment insurance benefits, so that people who have historically been ineligible remain eligible so they can continue to collect unemployment benefits; an increase in the amount of unemployment benefits, a $300-a-week overlay of Federal money on top of whatever their State program is; $600 per person, regardless of whether they lost income.

All of that was passed just a few days ago, and now we are told we need to come back immediately, right now, and make sure that we are sending $2,000 checks to people who had no lost income.

So for that reason, I object.

House Vote date: December 28, 2020 Vote Tally: 279-134

House Party Breakdown: This vote was taken under a suspension of the rules and required a ⅔ supermajority vote for passage – and that number was just barely achieved.  Almost all the Democrats voted YES on this bill, along with 44 Republicans. The NO votes were paced by 2 Democrats, 130 Republicans, and the lone Independent and Libertarian.


Additional Reading:

No Vote on the CASH Act was taken in the Senate, but Senator Toomey offered an objection to the measure passing by Unanimous Consent. Senator Casey has expressed support for the $2,000 payments via Twitter.

2021 Defense Spending sparks the first overturned VETO of the Trump Presidency 

House Vote to overturn veto on H.R. 6395: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021

Senate Vote on same

This excerpt from a CNN Politics article perfectly sums up the situation surrounding president Trump’s veto of the ust-pass Defense bill for 2021, along with the new political questions that have arisen with the first veto override of Trump’s presidency:

The question of the day is whether the veto vote signals waning Trump influence among GOP lawmakers, who could face a reckoning from the committed base of followers for whom the President is a hero.

There was still evidence of Trump’s power over the party in the defense veto, too. The top Republican in the House, Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California, was among the GOP lawmakers who supported the defense bill — which includes a pay raise for service members — but voted against overriding the veto out of deference to the outgoing President.

While the majority of Republicans supported the defense bill when it passed the House earlier in December, McCarthy did not rally support either for or against it after Trump’s veto. Trump, as part of his frustration with internet companies he says are unfair to conservatives online, wanted to use the bill as leverage to alter an unrelated portion of US law that exempts companies such as Facebook from liability for content produced by others but socialized on their sites.

There’s bipartisan agreement that the law deserves scrutiny, but changing the provision without debate was beyond his powers and a strange fit for Republicans who have long sought less liability for companies, not more.

House Vote date: Monday, December 28, 2020 House Vote Tally: 322-87

House Party Breakdown: Both the Democrats and Republicans had some level of dissent on overturning this veto. The Democrats split 212-20, with a number of members of the Progressive Caucus voting no on overturning the veto just as they had voted on no the original legislation.  The Republicans split 109-66, with 20 GOP lawmakers not voting.  Lone Independent Paul Mitchell voted YES to overturn the veto while lone Libertarian Justin Amash voted NO.

Senate Vote date: Friday, January 2, 2021 Senate Vote Tally: 81-13

Senate Party Breakdown: Much like the House vote, each party had some dissenters on overturning this veto. The Republicans split 40-7. The Democrats split 40-5, and the Independents split 1-1. A review of the Republicans who voted with President Trump and against overturning the veto looks like a partial list of 2024 presidential hopefuls, with names like Tom Cotton of Arkansas, Rand Paul of Kentucky, Josh Hawley of Missouri, and Ted Cruz of Texas.  On the Democratic/Independent side of things, the NO votes came from those who had voted against this defense spending package in the first place – Massachusetts pair Ed Markey and Elizabeth Warren, New Jersey’s Cory Booker,and Oregon’s pair of Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, and Vermont’s Bernie Sanders.

Additional Reading:

Senator Casey voted YES and Senator Toomey voted YES to override Trump’s veto.

Unanimously passed legislation

The following bills were passed through unanimous consent or voice vote (which presumes unanimity, as any member can object to the voice vote and ask for a roll call). This list excludes bills related to post offices, stamps, memorials, awareness weeks and other ceremonial activities.

  • H.R.1472 – To rename the Homestead National Monument of America near Beatrice, Nebraska, as the Homestead National Historical Park
  • H.R.4044 – Protect and Restore America’s Estuaries Act
  • S.371 – BUILD (Building Up Independent Lives and Dreams Act) Act
  • S.1310 – Organization of American States Legislative Engagement Act 
  • H.R.2444 – Eastern European Security Act
  • H.R.4508 – Malala Yousafzai Scholarship Act
  • S.5086 – A bill to allow Senators, Senators-elect, committees of the Senate, leadership offices, and other offices of the Senate to share employees

Legislation from Pennsylvania lawmakers in the 116th Congress

President Trump signed into law 269 bills (as of January 2, 2020) during the 116th Congress. Of those measures, 55 were assigning names to post offices and 5 gave new names to Veterans Affairs facilities. So once those ceremonial items are removed, there were 209 pieces of actual legislation passed by Congress and signed into law by the President.

Lawmakers often close out their legislative year with self-congratulatory emails to constituents that discuss just how much they have accomplished during the past Congress and list all the bills they had passed. The truth of the matter is that only 4 bills of those 209 bills that were enacted had a primary legislative sponsor from Pennsylvania.  It is true that sometimes portions of a lawmaker’s legislation is copied and inserted into giant omnibus bills (like the Defense Authorization bill that overcame a veto this week). And many lawmakers will co-sponsor any bill that is put in front of them.  But when all is said and done, these are the four enacted bills that had their roots in Pennsylvania:


Enacted Legislation

ENACTED January 17, 2020
H.R. 2385: To permit the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to establish a grant program to conduct cemetery research and produce educational materials for the Veterans Legacy Program.

  • PRIMARY SPONSOR – 🔵 PA-17’s Rep. Conor Lamb

Library of Congress Summary – “This bill authorizes the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to establish a grant program to conduct cemetery research and produce educational materials for the Veterans Legacy Program. The program provides the public with engagement and educational opportunities regarding veterans interred in national, state, or tribal veterans’ cemeteries. Additionally, the bill requires the VA to report on the efficacy of the grant program.”

ENACTED October 30, 2020

H.R. 2359: Whole Veteran Act

  • PRIMARY SPONSOR – 🔵 PA-17’s Rep. Conor Lamb

Library of Congress Summary – “This bill requires the Department of Veterans Affairs to report on the implementation of its whole health approach to health care. The report must include an analysis of the accessibility and availability of a variety of services, including hypnosis and acupuncture. The whole health model is a holistic approach that looks at the many areas of life that may affect health in order to make a health plan suited for each individual based on his or her health goals.”

ENACTED December 4, 2020

S. 3587: Department of Veterans Affairs Website Accessibility Act of 2019

  • PRIMARY SPONSOR – 🔵 Senator Bob Casey

Library of Congress Summary – “This bill directs the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to report to Congress regarding the accessibility of VA websites (including attached files and web-based applications) to individuals with disabilities. The report shall identify websites, files, and applications that are not accessible to such individuals and include the VA’s plan to make each of them accessible.”

ENACTED December 22, 2020

S. 134: Combat Online Predators Act

  • PRIMARY SPONSOR – 🔴 Senator Pat Toomey

Library of Congress Summary – “This bill increases the maximum prison term for a stalking offense, if the victim is under 18 years of age. The Department of Justice must report on best practices for enforcing laws related to stalking.”

Lawmaker Legislative Statistics – 116th Congress

The wonderful GOVTrack website also tracks legislation where a lawmaker’s original work is enacted via another bill. This could be because the House and Senate each had identical bills, and only one can be signed into law, or because a small bill was copied into a larger package.  That same site also tracks the number of bills each lawmaker cosponsors.

GOVTrack itself notes that “most legislators sponsor only a handful that are signed into law. But there are other legislative activities that we don’t track that are also important, including offering amendments, committee work and oversight of the other branches, and constituent services. We consider a bill enacted if one of the following is true: a) it is enacted itself, b) it has a companion bill in the other chamber (as identified by Congress) which was enacted, or c) if at least about half of its provisions were incorporated into bills that were enacted.”

Introduced bills

Introducing bills takes a reasonable expenditure of effort, depending on the breadth of the legislation in question. Staff needs to do a certain amount of research, and in addition to preparing the actual text of the bill, the lawmaker needs to seek out co-sponsors and prepare a press release and edit their website to include the new legislation. 

Original Cosponsor bills

Being an original cosponsor of legislation can involve some level of effort.  In some cases, an original cosponsor may have done as much work as the primary sponsor, and their staff may have been involved in the drafting of the bill language. Original cosponsors will general be involved in creation of press releases and making statements about the legislation as well.

Total Cosponsored bills

Frankly, anyone can cosponsor legislation. There is minimal effort involved. By cosponsoring, one is merely indicating they support the legislation.

Enacted legislation

This is the real test – getting a bill passed in both houses and signed into law by the president. The numbers below include all the items passed by lawmakers, even those post office names and bills that a lawmaker authored that got incorporated into some larger bill.

What you’ll see below when you compare these charts to the individual lawmaker items is that volume isn’t everything… except in getting bills actually passed.  Let’s compare Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (GOP, PA-01) to Rep. Lamb (DEM, PA-17). They are each the closest to the middle of the political spectrum from the members of their party.  Fitzpatrick is clearly the most prolific when it comes to cosponsoring bills (1,266) and being an original cosponsor (424) as compared to Lamb’s 329 and 60, respectively.  But Conor Lamb got 5 pieces of his own legislation enacted into law, while Fitzpatrick only got one of his own bills passed.  Which do you consider the more successful legislator?


Below, please find details on how the legislative work of all twenty of our Pennsylvania lawmakers fared in the 116th Congress. This takes much of the same materials in the charts above, but shows you it broken down by individual lawmakers.  If you click on the link for the number of bills, you will be brought to a list of those bills so you can review the legislation your lawmaker worked on:

🔵 Senator Bob Casey –
3 bills enacted as primary sponsor
105 bills introduced as primary sponsor

344 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
542 bills cosponsored
41 cosponsored bills enacted

Details on enacted legislation that Sen. Casey introduced: two measures were combined into the S. 3587: Department of Veterans Affairs Website Accessibility Act described above. He was also the Senate sponsor for S. 892: Rosie the Riveter Congressional Gold Medal Act, a bill that was enacted under the House version (H.R. 1773).

🔴 Senator Pat Toomey –
3 bills enacted as primary sponsor
32 bills introduced as primary sponsor

66 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
127 bills cosponsored
13 cosponsored bills enacted

Details on enacted legislation that Sen. Toomey introduced: S. 134: Combat Online Predators Act was described in the list of four items above; his S. 479: Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act was enacted under the House version (H.R. 724); and his S. 3798: Hong Kong Autonomy Act was also enacted under the House version (H.R. 7440).

🔴 PA-01’s Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick –
1 bill enacted as primary sponsor
36 bills introduced as primary sponsor

424 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
1,266 bills cosponsored
91 cosponsored bills enacted

Details on enacted legislation that Rep. Fitzpatrick introduced: he was the original House sponsor of H.R. 570: Combat Online Predators Act which passed in its Senate form.

🔵 PA-02’s Rep. Brendan Boyle –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
35 bills introduced as primary sponsor

195 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
474 bills cosponsored
32 cosponsored bills enacted

🔵 PA-03’s Rep. Dwight Evans –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
17 bills introduced as primary sponsor
183 bills introduced as an original cosponsor

541 bills cosponsored
25 cosponsored bills enacted

🔵 PA-04’s Rep. Madeleine Dean –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
25 bills introduced as primary sponsor

182 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
554 bills cosponsored
38 cosponsored bills enacted

🔵 PA-05’s Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon –
1 bill enacted as primary sponsor
23 bills introduced as primary sponsor

154 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
600 bills cosponsored
33 cosponsored bills enacted
Details on enacted legislation that Rep. Scanlon introduced: she was the primary sponsor of a bill that allows Medicaid to cover some home- and community-based services, H.R. 5443: Isaiah Baker and Margie Harris-Austin Act, and it was included in the CARES Act coronavirus relief package, H.R. 748

🔵 PA-06’s Rep. Chrissy Houlahan –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
23 bills introduced as primary sponsor

112 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
431 bills cosponsored
37 cosponsored bills enacted

🔵 PA-07’s Rep. Susan Wild –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
25 bills introduced as primary sponsor

226 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
705 bills cosponsored
45 cosponsored bills enacted

🔵 PA-08’s Rep. Matt Cartwright –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
57 bills introduced as primary sponsor

145 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
533 bills cosponsored
31 cosponsored bills enacted

🔴 PA-09’s Rep. Dan Meuser –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
9 bills introduced as primary sponsor

34 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
188 bills cosponsored
21 cosponsored bills enacted

🔴 PA-10’s Rep. Scott Perry –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
22 bills introduced as primary sponsor

93 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
253 bills cosponsored
20 cosponsored bills enacted

🔴 PA-11’s Rep. Lloyd Smucker –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
17 bills introduced as primary sponsor 

48 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
195 bills cosponsored
21 cosponsored bills enacted

🔴 PA-12’s Rep. Fred Keller –
1 bill enacted as primary sponsor
7 bills introduced as primary sponsor

23 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
182 bills cosponsored
13 cosponsored bills enacted
Details on enacted legislation that Rep. Keller introduced: he got to rename a post office in Laceyville, PA

🔴 PA-13’s Rep. John Joyce –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
8 bills introduced as primary sponsor

67 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
245 bills cosponsored
19 cosponsored bills enacted

🔴 PA-14’s Rep. Guy Reschenthaler –
1 bill enacted  as primary sponsor
13 bills introduced as primary sponsor

89 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
344 bills cosponsored
34 cosponsored bills enacted
Details on enacted legislation that Rep. Reschenthaler introduced: his H.R. 2368: Supporting and Treating Officers In Crisis Act of 2019 was enacted via the Senate version of the bill (S. 998

🔴 PA-15’s Rep. Glenn W. Thompson –
no bills enacted as primary sponsor
15 bills introduced as primary sponsor

92 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
279 bills cosponsored
28 cosponsored bills enacted

🔴 PA-16’s Rep. Mike Kelly –
1 bill enacted as primary sponsor
10 bills introduced as primary sponsor
297 bills cosponsored

149 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
33 cosponsored bills enacted
Details on enacted legislation that Rep. Kelly introduced: his H.R. 1084: Family Savings Act of 2019 was included in the very large spending bill, H.R. 1865: Further Consolidated Appropriations Act 2020

🔵 PA-17’s Rep. Conor Lamb
5 bills enacted as primary sponsor 
16 bills introduced as primary sponsor

60 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
329 bills cosponsored
31 cosponsored bills enacted
Details on enacted legislation that Rep. Lamb introduced: 2 of his bills were described in the list above; on top of that, he renamed a post office in Hookstown, PA; and two of Rep. Lamb’s other bills, his H.R. 8147: Testing, Researching, and Expanding Alternative Treatments (TREAT) Act  and his H.R. 8149: VA Precision Medicine Act were included in the much larger S. 785, a measure that included a number of efforts to improve VA facilities and care provided

🔵 PA-18’s Rep. Mike Doyle –
1 bill enacted as primary sponsor
7 bills introduced as primary sponsor 

144 bills introduced as an original cosponsor
418 bills cosponsored
34 cosponsored bills enacted
Details on enacted legislation that Rep. Doyle introduced: his H.R. 5035: Television Viewer Protection Act of 2019 was included in the omnibus spending bill, H.R. 1865: Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020

Call to Action – Your Last Chance to Help in Georgia!

Having you been doing all you can to ensure that we win those two senate runoff elections in Georgia? That pair of outcomes will determine if the Biden Administration has a legislative partner focused on solutions in the Senate or if he will be faced with years of McConnell-flavored obstructionism.

Indivisible is hosting a National Call A Thon for the Georgia Runoff with Alyssa Milano! 
DATE: Jan 4, 2021
TIME: 06:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Participants need to have access to a phone line, a computer, and internet access. We will be calling Georgia voters in the final hours before the election, making sure they have plans to get out and vote on Election Day, January 5th.


Sign up HERE

And a Preview for the 117th Congress, which came up just as the report-editing was wrapping up…

From the sounds of it, all Pennsylvania Republicans present voted for the House Minority Leader from the 116th Congress, Kevin McCarthy of California. Eight of our nine Pennsylvania Democrats voted for Nancy Pelosi to be the Speaker of the House for the 117th Congress.  The outlier is PA-17’s Conor Lamb, who voted for Rep. Hakeem Jeffries.

This report is brought to you by the Pennsylvania  MoCTrack team… 

CC Susan Vogel

Gary Garb Kierstyn Piotrowski Zolfo

Linda Houk We can always use extra help. Our Congresspeople are always busy and there is always more for us to cover — tasks big and small to fit any level of time commitment or experience. Would you be willing to listen to a committee hearing and transcribe a few quotes from Pennsylvania lawmakers? Or are you a topic specialist on an issue of concern to activists, and would you like to contribute an occasional column?  Please email KierstynPZ@gmail.com and put “MoCTrack Help” in the subject. Thanks!


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